Pattern testing of Canary Cami by Wearable Studio

Canary+Cami+Header+image

It is official! I am a pattern tester !!! If you told me a year ago that I will become a pattern tester I would not believe you, but here I am taking on a new opportunity and a challenge of testing a newly released pattern from Wearable Studio.

The pattern is called Canary Cami and can be purchased as a PDF pattern, which is amazing if you do not like waiting for a postman hihihi

 

The pattern

Canary Cami is a simple pattern based on a classic top that we all love to wear. It has an interesting princess seam for a better fit that extend and create a flirty and eye catching fluted sleeves…..my favorite detail of this pattern… It’s fairly loose fit is perfect if you live an active life.

I had cut size 16 based on my bust measurement and had to cut off about 9 cm of the hem, because it was very long on me. When I think about it now it could be better if I had raised the waistline instead as this created a saggy looking bust and I had to increase the seam under the bust by about half centimeter for closer fit.

20180720_162202

The construction

The pattern consist of only 3 pieces so it can be considered a quick make, by an experience sewer, however it can be a little tricky for a total beginner because the seams are curved and the hem and sleeves are finished with bias binding….but do not fear…the instruction and step by step explanation are extremely helpful.

For the best result first I made sure that all notches are precisely matched for front and back princess seam. I used a ton (slight exaggeration??) of pins to secure it in place.

20180720_105935

Hand basting curved seams is time consuming, but the final result is worth it. It also prevent the fabric from shifting while sewing or damaging the fabric (if you sew over the pins).

20180720_111036

Having my seams basted in place I clipped the seam allowance to avoid making puckering or mini pleats while sewing with the machine. This was also recommended in the instruction at the later stage.

20180720_110921

Look at that princess seam.

20180720_150321

I must say I am not a pro when it comes to using bias binding, but this project has definitely improved my skills and made me realize that there is nothing to be afraid of! At the end of the instruction manual you will find a helpful tip on how to make your own bias binding at home, which I did not try this time because I did not have any fabric leftover.

I had used a ready made bias binding and cannot be happier with how it turned out.

20180720_150504

Final thoughts

This pattern was easy to make and I have enjoyed the whole process from start to finish. I am glad that I used this lovely pink viscose for this project as it is soft and drapy and it creates more desired effect. TIP: use bias binding that has similar weight and structure that of your main fabric to allow the fabric to hang and drape properly on your body.

20180720_162350

~Have you ever thought of becoming a pattern tester?~

Monika xxx

Author: All Sew Petite

This blog is about my love of sewing. I will try to document all my makes, any patterns adjustments or fitting issues...and there will be many as a petite person i can barely find anything that fits.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s