Marigold by Tilly & The Buttons

Marigold dungaree

It is nearly end of the month, so it is time for another #sewmystyle2018 project reveal. In the last few day Spring has finally arrived to United Kingdom, so April’s pattern seams like a perfect match.

It is a Tilly & the Buttons’ Marigold Jumpsuit pattern.

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The pattern calls for a light or medium weight drapey fabrics and I have used a poly crepe de chine in plain black color that I had in my stash. It was lovely to work with however I did not have nearly enough for the full length trousers I wanted to make.

This time I have ordered printed pattern, because I have a lot of study this month and did not want to waste time gluing “million” of pages together (a little exaggeration hihihi, but this is how sometimes it feels). The pattern arrived in the next 2 days, and I started to trace the pieces right away.

Pattern adjustments

After making a mock up I decided that need to shorten around the hip area by 3 cm. I used the shorten/ lengthen lines on the pattern to be my guide and marked it on both front and back pattern pieces.

Next, I have cut and stick the pattern pieces closing the 3 cm gap and then re-drafted the crotch curve.

I have done a similar adjustment to a pocket pieces.

I decided to shave off 15mm from the waist going to nothing to reduce the excess fabric. If you have to go between sizes make sure you do the same adjustment for all pattern pieces, here it is a back piece, pocket piece and a waist band piece.

To add a little “originality” to my Marigold I have traced off the top front CLEO pattern and used extended CLEO strap pattern to accommodate for a longer straps and re-used the same pattern for a belt.

My Marigold

I absolutely love the final look!!! This will be my new favorite outfit to go to the park and have a picnic 🙂

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Having a belt adds a little character to this piece and in my opining it looks great with the pockets and a top-stitched front pleats.

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Back crossed straps also ensure that I do not have to worry about them falling down if I decide to be more active.

Unintended color matching in the picture hihihi

Sunny top and my new Marigold form quite a comfortable outfit.

Now it is time to pack my blue blanket, get some ice-cream and enjoy the sun in the park 🙂

~How is your Marigold???~

Monika xxx

Sewing in-seam pocket vol.1

Finally I have started working on my McCall’s jacket. It is a first time that I am making a fully lined jacket and I am scared that will mess it up.

The pattern includes in-seam pockets, which I am not confident of making. I have been researching a lot to find the best technique and discovered that there are so many ways of sewing an in-seam pockets, so I have decided to document each method that I will come across and see which one I like the most and which one gives the cleanest results.

In-seam pocket tutorial

Below is a step by step method that I have used following the pattern instructions.

Before you start make sure you have cut all pocket pieces (4 in total if you doing two pockets), your front panel pieces and your back panel pieces. Do not forget to transfer all necessary markings such as notches indicating a pocket opening (you can see a purple dot on my fabric). This method DOES NOT finish off the raw edges, so it is best being used on a garments with lining.

Step 1. Stitch pocket piece along the seam of front and back pieces using 6 mm seam. (Usually this is a side seam, however it all depends on style lines of the garment you are making.)

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Step 2. Press seams going inwards the pocket. (Do this to all 4 seams).

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Step 3. Facing the RIGHT sides of the fabrics together, pin front and back pocket pieces together aligning the newly sewn seam. (Do this again for the other pocket).

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Step 4. Stitch along the pocket edge using allocated seam allowance stopping at the marked point. With needle being down turn the fabric and stitch the side seams below the pocket.

Next, stitch the side seam above the pocket.

inseam pocket

 

Step 5. Now simply clip back seam allowance and press it open.

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Step 6. Give it a final press and you are done.

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Final thoughts

Although this method is quick I am not 100% satisfied with the end result. Don’t get me wrong….it looks good, however I feel like the opening of the pocket should be stabilized somehow. Maybe I am paranoid here, because the lower part of the jacket is a peplum, which is kind of round, so the pocket opening may stretch with time as I use it. Other then that I am not convinced that snipped seam allowance will not fray….hmmm

Time will tell I guess.

What do you think? Did you ever used this method?

Monika xxx